Course Catalog

(All course information is subject change)

*PH 100: Inferential Methods and Systematic Review: Part 1
In this course students engage in thinking about common health care related questions and identifying basic approaches and challenges to studying them. Part 1 of this course focuses on recognizing the purpose, structure, strengths and weaknesses of various study designs, while developing skills to critically assess the relevance and validity of their conclusions. At the same time, each student begins to develop a research question of their own and, after conducting a preliminary literature search, submits a proposal for conducting a systematic review.
      Late Summer term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
      *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
      Prerequisites: None
     Faculty: Natalie Riblet, Shama Alam

*PH 102: Inferential Methods and Systematic Review: Part 2
Part 2 of this course is dedicated to step-by-step instruction on conducting and communicating the findings of a systematic review. Students work in pairs or trios to hone a single research question, identify and critically appraise the peer-reviewed literature on the topic, use statistical analyses to interpret and summarize their findings, and present the work in both a poster session and a final manuscript. Each team submits multiple intermediate products (a revised proposal, data collection forms, draft methods, mock tables and figures, an abstract, and a draft paper) and is given numerous opportunities for peer and instructor feedback prior to presenting their poster and submitting their final manuscript.
      Fall term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
      *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
      Prerequisites: PH 100
     Faculty: Natalie Riblet, Shama Alam

 *PH 111: Critical Issues in Health and Health Care
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for all newly-enrolled Master's students to develop a foundational understanding of critical issues in health and health care today, especially as they relate to key aspects of the research and practice of TDI. The course will use lectures and a series of case studies, discussed from both the public health and health care delivery perspectives, to provide grounding in issues that can be explored in depth during the rest of the academic year. Students will explore how to improve the health of a population, the boundaries and financing of the US health care system, and different methods used to analyze and present solutions to problems in health and health care.

      Late Summer term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
      *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
      Prerequisites: None
      Faculty: Paul Gardent

PH 112: Medical Care and the Corporation
This course is intended to 1) illustrate the applicability of management concepts and techniques to the health care and biotechnology industries; 2) enhance the ability of managers to serve as trustees of health care organizations; and 3) demonstrate how corporate managers can exercise judgment and control over expenditures for health care benefits while protecting the health of their employees. The characteristics and components of the health care system and their interactions and determinants will be analyzed. The history of corporate and governmental intervention in health care will be reviewed. The importance of understanding the medical market dynamics and the options for data-driven strategies for market reform will be stressed. Case examples will highlight the use of new analytic techniques for understanding and managing the medical markets.
      Fall term; 3 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC). Enrollment in this course is officially in the Fall term, although the course starts during the Late Summer term. This course is cross-listed with Tuck School of Business in their MBA program. It is limited       to MS students in Health Care Leadership concentration.
     Prerequisites: None
     Faculty: Michael Zubkoff, Paul Gardent

PH 113: Current Issues in Health Policy: Understanding Health Reform (SHORT COURSE)
This five-week two-credit short course is intended to further students understanding of health policy and financing in the United States through study of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Specific areas of study will include accountable care organizations, health information technology, employer and individual insurance mandates, comparative effectiveness research, and insurance expansions. Learning takes place through readings of selected manuscripts, lecture and discussion, and assignments.
    Winter term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: None

    Faculty: Carrie Colla

PH 115: Strategic & Financial Management of Health Care Institutions
Strategic and Financial Management of Health Care Institutions offers students the opportunity to learn about and practice strategic and financial management as those disciplines apply to health care institutions. By the end of the course, students will be able to understand financial accounting, cost accounting, financial analysis, financial strategy, organizational structure, strategic planning, environmental analysis, and marketing. Students will be able to apply financial techniques to strategic analysis of the health care environment, cost reduction in health care and to organizational decision making. The ability to apply that knowledge will be reinforced through projects, casework and homework problems. The course integrates textbooks, cases, and projects. The first half of the course focuses on financial analysis; the second half of the course focuses on strategy.
    Winter term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Required for MPH
    Prerequisites: No economics preparation assumed

    Faculty: Paul Gardent

*PH 117: Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Overview
This course offers participants the opportunity to discover and preview the knowledge, methods, and skills necessary to effect the continual improvement of the quality and value of health care. Participants will be offered an opportunity to connect that knowledge, and those methods and skills, to their personal life and work. This course includes a significant amount of weekly pre-class preparation. Small group work is encouraged during the afternoon lab period.
      Late Summer term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
      *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
      Prerequisites: None
     Faculty: Tina Foster, Jeremiah Brown, Daisy Goodman

PH 119: Decision and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis: Practicum
This course, which covers the fundamental principles and mechanics of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis, is offered in conjunction with PH 121 (see its description below). Students in PH 119 participate in the same weekly assignments and attend the same lectures as students in PH 121, but students in PH 119 complete an independent practicum project and paper instead of a small group project. Approval of a practicum project by the course instructors is required before a student can pre-register for PH 119.
    Spring term; 6 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 100, 139, 140, and permission from instructor prior to pre-registration.
    Faculty: Anna Tosteson, Elissa Ozanne

PH 121: Decision and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis  
This course covers the fundamental principles and mechanics of decision analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis. Topics covered in the course include basics of probability (including Bayes’ Theorem), structuring decision problems as decision trees and Markov models, components of preference (value preference, time preference, and risk preference), valuing multidimensional outcomes, evaluating decision trees, sensitivity analysis, value of information, and basic principles of cost-effectiveness analysis. The course has a weekly lab that involves use of decision analysis software to reinforce concepts presented in class. Labs are also used for development, progress review and discussion of small group decision analysis projects, which culminate in formal presentations the last week of class. Weekly problem sets are also used to reinforce the concepts presented in class.
    Spring term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 100, PH 139, 140
    Faculty: Anna Tosteson, Elissa Ozanne

PH 122: Survey Research Methods and Principles
                  This course introduces the basic skills needed to conduct and present survey research. It will focus on two aspects of such research: designing and administering a survey (primary data collection); and accessing, analyzing and reporting on data from publicly available national survey data (secondary data analysis). Topics covered will include survey design, sampling, validity, reliability, data collection, analysis, interpretation and reporting of results. To reinforce practical skills, the course will include weekly computer labs, research in progress sessions to critique draft survey instruments, and a journal club to critically read articles reporting survey results.
      Winter term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
      Prerequisites: PH 139, 140 (and PH 100 preferred)
     Faculty: Lisa Schwartz, Steve Woloshin

PH 124: Design & Improvement of Clinical Microsystems
This course creates an opportunity for students to study and apply the principles and concepts learned in PH 117, The Continual Improvement of Health Care, to the work of managing the health and value of health care for a defined population of patients. Participants will work in partnership with selected managed care settings throughout the United States. Specifically, this course will offer participants an opportunity to identify the processes involved in managing a panel of patients, learn the knowledge and skills providers need to manage panels and provide optimal patient care, identify approaches for taking costs out of the care while maintaining or improving quality and enhancing customer satisfaction, understand the difference between the efforts for improvement of care at the front line and in the front office and how they may be related, and identify some of the barriers to making the health of a population better.
    Spring term; 6 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 117, PH 126
    Faculty: Tina Foster, Marjorie Godfrey

PH 125: Qualitative Methods Toolbox (SHORT COURSE)
This short course is aimed at helping students develop basic skills with commonly used non-numeric data. We will cover approaches to sound collection of data, and move through an actual data analysis process, finishing with written and visual communication of findings. The basic principles of qualitative research design and analysis using grounded theory will be covered. In addition, students will gain experience with interviewing and focus group facilitation, basic data analysis (by hand and with qualitative analysis software), and other relevant qualitative research skills.
    Winter term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 100
    Faculty: Louise Davies, Michele Lanham

PH 126: Statistical Measurement and Analysis for Quality Improvement
This course explores the history and theory of statistical process control and its application to health care. Specific topics covered include: development of measures; data collection; graphical display of data; the theory and construction of control charts for means, proportions, counts and rare events; statistical testing with control charts; analysis of means. Benchmarking and an organizational approach to measurement and improvement are discussed. Different study designs for improvement work are explored. The course emphasizes application of theories and principles through the use of case studies, small group exercises and interactive discussions with guest presenters. Lab exercises, a group project and a take-home final exam are required elements of the course.
    Winter term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 117 (and PH 139 and 140 preferred)
    Faculty: Brant Oliver, Jeremiah Brown

PH 127: Patient Safety: Reducing Medical Errors (SHORT COURSE)
With medical errors causing up to 98,000 deaths each year in US hospitals, Patient Safety is a topic of great importance. This course will teach students the basic concepts and principles of patient safety, and will arm them with practical tools to improve Patient Safety in healthcare settings. Students will also learn about important resources on Patient Safety that will allow them to keep up to date with new emerging knowledge in Safety.
     Fall term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 117
    Faculty: Sam Casella
           
PH 130: Practical Approaches for Today’s Health Care Ethics Challenges (SHORT COURSE)
This highly interactive, short course is designed to give students an overview of health care ethics, including recognizing and responding to contemporary clinical, research, and organizational ethical conflicts in health care. The students will become familiar with the application of ethics principles to today’s health care ethics challenges faced by health care professionals. Through the discussion of case studies, students will build practical ethical reasoning skills and strategies for dealing with frequently encountered ethics issues, as well as approaches for anticipating and decreasing the presence of ethics conflicts. Students will also gain an understanding of the structure and function of a Hospital Ethics Committees and an Institutional Review Board/Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. Emphasis throughout the short course will be on critical thinking, real-world application and ethical decision-making in a professional environment.  Two guest faculty, including Howard Brody, MD, PhD (Director, Institute for the Medical Humanities, Professor, Family Medicine, University of Texas, Galveston) will augment the primary faculty.
     Late Summer term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: Bill Nelson

PH 131: Patient-Centered Health Communications
Health care decisions are complicated – really complicated – and frequently lack evidence to determine a ‘one best’ course of treatment. As such, patient‐centered health communications increasingly are recognized as a critical means to facilitate health care decisions that provide patients with “the care they need, and no less; and the care they want and no more” (Al Mulley, The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science).
The objectives of this short course are to 1) engage you to think broadly about the impact of communication at the patient, institutional, and population level; 2) to gain skills and experience related to the design and development of decision support tools and methods; 3) to understand the challenges involved in implementing decision support into practice at both at the institution and international level.
    Winter term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: None

    Faculty: Alice Andrews, Dale Vidal, Paul Barr


PH 132: Dealing with Differences: Communication, Negotiation, and Teamwork
Conflict is inevitable – we negotiate our differences every day, whether we are public health practitioners, clinicians, administrators or researchers. Working effectively in public health and health care depends on our ability to manage conflict effectively, learn how to understand others’ perspectives and interests, and both give and receive feedback. If poorly managed or avoided, conflict reduces productivity, undermines trust and leads to worse outcomes. If viewed as an opportunity to explore the concerns and different perspectives that others may have, working through these differences can enable individuals and teams to come up with better solutions and work more effectively. This elective will teach you the basic principles and skills of how to engage effectively with differences and conflicts, understand the strengths and weaknesses of how you tend to approach conflict in your life, and provide you a framework for thinking about both communication and negotiation. You will have the opportunity to practice negotiating a job offer.

We will have a very active learning environment with exercises and simulations done in pairs and small groups, in addition to brief didactics and discussions. You will receive individual coaching and regular feedback.
     Fall term; 1 credit; (HP, P, LP, NC)
     Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: Elliott Fisher, Nan Cochran

*PH 139: Epidemiology/Biostatistics: Part 1
The epidemiology component of this course introduces the basic principles of epidemiology, including formulation of the research question, choice of study subjects, measures of disease frequency, assessment of exposure and disease status, study design (cross-sectional studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials), measures of association between exposure and disease (risk ratio and risk difference measures) and causal inference. Taught as lectures and assigned exercises, this course stresses the practical applications of epidemiological techniques.

The biostatistical topics in this course include vital rates and ratios, probability concepts, discrete and continuous probability distributions, populations and samples, and introduction to the use of computers for statistical analysis.
    Late Summer term, 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
    Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: David Goodman, Aurora Drew 

*PH 140: Epidemiology/Biostatistics: Part 2
The epidemiology component of this course extends the basic principles of epidemiology from PH139 and introduces additional basic principles of epidemiology, including measurement precision and accuracy, use of statistical testing, and interval estimation in epidemiological studies. Taught as lectures and assigned exercises, this course stresses the practical applications of epidemiological techniques.
The biostatistical topics in this course include exploring and organizing data, life tables, nonparametric analysis, sampling distributions and statistical inference, statistical estimations, hypothesis testing, sample size and power, two-sample comparisons, multiple comparisons, association and correlation, and simple linear regression.
    Fall term, 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    *Core Requirement for MPH and MS
    Prerequisites: PH 139
    Faculty: David Goodman, Aurora Drew 

PH 141: Regression and Other Approaches
The epidemiological portion examines methods used to evaluate the role of chance, bias, and confounding in epidemiological studies. Topics include sources and definitions of bias and confounding, analytic techniques, e.g., stratified analyses, Mantel-Hanszel techniques, uses of logistic regression analysis in cohort and case control studies, and introduction to life table analysis using both Kaplan-Meir and regression techniques. Other topics include planning data management and analysis in epidemiological studies and estimating sample size. Lectures are illustrated by reference to epidemiological data.
            The biostatistical portion of the course continues the examination of topics raised in the Late Summer and Fall terms (See PH 139 and 140).
    Winter term; 6 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 139, PH 140
    Faculty: Brenda Sirovich

*PH 144: The Current Status of Practice Variation Research
This short course will focus on readings from the book, Tracking Medicine, by John E. (Jack) Wennberg. Wennberg reviews his and his colleagues' work on practice variations, beginning with small area variation in Vermont, extending through efforts to evaluate the reasons behind variation in surgical procedures, and concluding with the more recent work associated with overuse of supply sensitive care as described in the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. The course includes significant time for discussion and interaction.
    Fall term; 1 credit, (HP, P, LP, NC)
    *Core Requirement for MPH and MS (for students entering MPH and MS programs in Late Summer 2012 or after)
    Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: Jack Wennberg, David Goodman

PH 147: Advanced Methods in Health Services Research
This course will develop student analytic competencies to the level necessary to conceptualize, plan, carry out, and effectively communicate small research projects in patient care, epidemiology, or health services. Lectures, demonstrations, and labs will be used to integrate and extend methods introduced in other TDI courses. The course will also cover new methods in epidemiology and health services. The students will use research datasets from the Medical Care Epidemiology Unit at TDI, including Medicare data, in classroom lab exercises and course assignments. Course topics focus on key aspects observational research including risk adjustment, multilevel analyses, instrumental variables, and small area analysis. Practical skill areas will include programming in STATA, studying datasets for completeness and quality, designing tables, and figures, and data management techniques.  Emphasis is on becoming independent in analytic workflow. The instructors will tutor students as they develop their own analytic projects. 
    Spring term; 6 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 139, 140, 141
    Faculty: Tracy Onega

PH 148: International Perspectives on Health Care Systems (SHORT COURSE) 
This course provides an examination of the U.S. health care system through a comparison with other countries.  This critique will challenge the student’s view of U.S. health care (The U.S. may do better than you think!) and will establish a foundation for further inquiry into non U.S. health care systems. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify promising ideas that could be applied to the U.S. Students will also understand generalizable concepts of health systems that are necessary to work or learn in international settings.  Each class session will discuss a particular country.  In class exercises, students will use data from the OECD and other sources to develop quantitative descriptions of health care across countries.  Out of class assignments will include reading, viewing video clips, and three essays on assigned topics.  This class is intended to accommodate a broad range of interests and learning styles. 
    Spring term; 2 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: PH 111, 139
    Faculty: David Goodman

PH 151: Environmental Health Science and Policy
This course engages students in the exploration of major environmental and occupational health issues through application of the basic tools of environmental science including epidemiologic methods, toxicology and risk assessment. Participants will examine the relationship between environmental and occupational exposures and human disease with emphasis on the interface of science and policy, the role of regulatory agencies and environmental risk communication. Topics include air and water quality, hazardous waste, radiation, heavy metals, food safety, environmental pathogens, and clinical occupational medicine. Faculty use a variety of teaching tools including lectures, audiovisual media, case studies, guest experts, and assigned readings/exercises. As a culminating project, students will author an environmental policy white paper based on a synthesis of scientific evidence.
    Winter term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Required for MPH
    Prerequisites: PH 139 (or equivalent introductory epidemiology/biostatistics course) and PH 100 or approval of the instructor.
   Faculty: Bob McLellan, Carolyn Murray

PH 154: Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health
This course describes the evolution of the predominant illness patterns that dominate contemporary populations. It delves into explanations for individual and population health that focus primarily social and behavioral determinants for health promotion and disease prevention. Finally, it examines local and global responses to burgeoning factors that will significantly impact population health in the coming decades.
    Fall term; 4 credits; (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Required for MPH
    Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: Samir Soneji 
     

PH 161: MPH Internship
The public health field internship provides students with an opportunity to apply principles and skills learned in the classroom - the measurement, organization, and improvement of public health care - to real situations in the field. A minimum of 120 hours is to be spent at the placement site during the winter and spring terms. Typically, this internship occurs in the final term of the year, but other arrangements are possible, typically for part-time students, with permission of the course director. Students who have completed their internships prepare and present an overview of their experience at the conclusion of the spring term and complete an exit appraisal of their experience and achievements.
    Spring term; 4 credits (C, NC)
    Required for MPH; Not available for MS, PhD, Post-doc or Special students.
    Prerequisites: PH 100, 102, 111, 115, 117, 139, 140, 151, and 154 or consent of course directors.
    Faculty: Lisa Purvis, Meghan Longacre

PH 177-179: MPH and MS Capstone Course Series 1-3
The overarching goal of these courses, a series of three capstone seminars taught during the academic year, is to guide and support students throughout the completion of an academically robust, high quality culminating Capstone Project.  Each week the class will meet briefly as a single group, followed by smaller group meetings to address the process and content of specific projects.
    Fall, Winter, Spring terms; 2 credits each term (HP, P, LP, NC)
    Prerequisites: None
    Faculty: Jeremiah Brown, Peter Thurber with other advising faculty

PH 187, PH 188, and PH 189: Directed Readings
Students may participate in a Directed Readings course through arrangements with a faculty member. “Directed” coursework involves readings and special projects, and is subject to approval by an approved TDI faculty supervisor and the Associate Director of Education (for master’s degree students) or the Chair of their program (for PhD students).
Directed Readings are typically literature reviews on a specific topic with a paper due at the end of the term that provides an overview of the topic(s) to be reviewed, the references read and the process used to identify readings and that summarizes the theory and evidence found in the literature review. In addition to meeting with faculty regularly and conducting literature searches throughout the term, an average of 12 hours each week devoted to the readings and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 4 credit Directed Reading (PH 187). An average of 24 hours each week devoted to the readings and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 8 credit Directed Reading (PH 188). An average of 36 hours devoted each week to the readings and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 12 credit Directed Reading (PH 189).
     All terms: By arrangement. (HP/P/LP/NC)
     PH 187 is four credits; PH 188 is eight credits; PH 189 is twelve credits.
     Prerequisites for Master’s degree students: Core courses or permission of an approved faculty supervisor and an Approved Proposal. To obtain the Directed Readings proposal form, please contact Liz Koelsch in the Education Office. To obtain approval of proposal, prior to the beginning of the term please submit by email to Karen Tombs the Readings cover sheet and proposal with an electronic signature or email from the proposed TDI faculty supervisor.

PH 197, PH 198, and PH 199: Directed Research
Students may participate in a Directed Research course through arrangements with a faculty member. MS students are required to enroll in PH 197 during their final term. “Directed” coursework involves a specific research proposal and is subject to approval by an approved TDI faculty supervisor and the Associate Director of Education (for Master’s degree students) or the Chair of their program (for PhD students).
When the intended work to be accomplished is considered to be ‘deep background’ reading for the student’s general training or topic, choose directed readings courses (PH 187-189); see separate guidelines. On the other hand, if the literature review to be accomplished is intended to be primarily directly related to preparing a dissertation or other research project, use the directed research courses. Also use directed research for preparing the PhD proposal and for carrying out all research activities for design, analysis, and writing up the findings.
In addition to meeting with faculty regularly and conducting research activities throughout the term, an average of 12 hours each week devoted to the research and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 4 credit Directed Research (PH 197). An average of 24 hours each week devoted to the research and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 8 credit Directed Research (PH 198). An average of 36 hours devoted each week to the research and preparation of the products during the 10 week term is worthy of a 12 credit Directed Research (PH 199).
     All terms: By arrangement. (HP/P/LP/NC)
     PH 197 is four credits; PH 198 is eight credits; PH 199 is twelve credits.
    Prerequisites for Master’s degree students: Core courses or permission of the Associate Director of Education and an Approved Proposal. To obtain the Directed Research proposal form, please contact Liz Koelsch in the Education Office. To obtain approval of proposal, submit to Karen Tombs the Research cover sheet and proposal with an electronic signature or email from the proposed TDI faculty supervisor.
          
PH 250-254: Supervised Teaching
 This experience for the student teacher assumes that the course has been developed and taught in prior terms. Course faculty and the student teaching assistant (TA) work closely to develop and evaluate discussion assignments and associated homework. TAs conduct discussion sessions in courses under the supervision of the course faculty. TAs may be encouraged to present lectures for which they receive detailed feedback on their teaching style. TAs receive instruction on effective teaching techniques, such as how to teach the material, how to run a discussion, how to evaluate student responses, and grading. TA performance will be monitored throughout the term and the supervising faculty will provide appropriate evaluation, coupled with detailed suggestions for improvement.
Teaching Assistants should plan on being available for 13 weeks of a 10-week course, for final course planning prior to the start of the term and student evaluation purposes after the end of the term.
     All terms: By arrangement. (PH 250=1/2 cr; PH 251=1 cr; PH 252=2 cr; PH 253=3 cr; PH 254=4 cr). (Credit/No Credit grade).
     Prerequisites: PhD student, familiarity with the subject matter, and prior approval from Karen Tombs and the supervising faculty member; MS and MPH students must request an exception from the Karen Tombs to participate.

PH 257-259: Advanced-Level Student Teaching
This experience for the student teacher assumes that the student has had considerable experience in teaching this course content. This is an advanced teaching course in which student teachers are given the opportunity to refine their teaching techniques and expand their role, under the supervision of the course faculty, and to include more advanced levels of responsibility as an instructor compared to those expected under PH 256. Students enrolling in this course must have completed their programmatic teaching requirement and otherwise be experienced as a teacher and exceptionally proficient in the subject matter.
    All terms: By arrangement. 1-3 credits (PH 257=1 credit; PH 258=2 credits; PH 259=3 credits). (Credit/No Credit grade)
    Prerequisites: PhD student, familiarity with the subject matter, and prior approval from Karen Tombs and the supervising faculty member.

PH 276-279: Supervised Research Assistantship
Only PhD Students, PhD Candidates, or non-degree-seeking postdoctoral fellows with a thesis degree may sign up for Supervised Research Assistantship Courses. When the intended work to be accomplished is considered to be for training as a research assistant and work to be completed is for a grant or work of the faculty member and the student would not qualify for first authorship on reports or publications and is being paid hourly as a student employee, the student should sign up for Supervised Research Assistantship courses at the appropriate level. Otherwise, the student should sign up for directed research.
    All terms: By arrangement. (Credit/No Credit)
    Prerequisites: Doctoral student or candidate status or post-doctoral fellow

PH 297, PH 298, and PH 299: Doctoral Research
Thesis research under the guidance of a faculty member who is the student’s designated Dissertation Research Advisor. See Tabs 3 and 7 in the PhD Student Handbook for more details and examples of acceptable proposals.
    All terms: By arrangement.
    PH 297 is four credits; PH 298 is eight credits; PH 299 is twelve credits.
    Prerequisites: PhD candidacy status, including successfully defending the thesis proposal.

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