Updates


Q&A with Devin Parker, MS ’14 For Dartmouth Institute alumna Devin Parker, MS ’14, the opportunity to collaborate on a published article with renowned pediatric care researcher Dr. David Goodman, MD, MS, was a milestone in her career. What started as Parker’s capstone research on studying the rates of ear tube insertions to treat children with ear infections evolved…

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Health care leaders and policy makers agree that in order to improve health outcomes and lower costs, we have to address patients’ nonmedical needs. Estimates suggest that 40-90% of health outcomes are attributable to social, behavioral, and economic factors, such as homelessness or food insecurity. For example, a study of chronically homeless adults with severe alcohol problems showed…

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One afternoon several months ago, Dartmouth researcher Sarah Pratt received a phone call she didn’t expect. Brian Collins, who heads up a behavioral health and developmental services organization in Strafford County in New Hampshire, had a proposal he wanted to discuss with her. Collins had previously been part of a statewide research effort that Pratt and her colleagues at…

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Dartmouth Institute Professor Bill Black shares insight on new reporting and management guidelines for screening and incidental detection at the international Preventing Overdiagnosis Conference A practicing radiologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Bill Black has long been a self-described ‘critic’ of how common practices in radiology have led to the “over-pursuit” of small…

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Mammography screening is credited with saving women’s lives by detecting small malignant tumors “early”—before they grow large enough to cause symptoms. Conventional wisdom holds that over time effective screening should lead to a decrease in larger tumors as smaller tumors are found earlier. However, a new study by researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health…

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The fast growing population of adults afflicted with dementia poses an enormous challenge to the U.S. healthcare system. In 2016, the total cost of care associated with Alzheimer's and other dementias is estimated to be around $236 billion, on par or higher than the financial burden of heart disease and cancer. With just under half of those dementia-related costs borne by Medicare, a…

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Whether they’ve come from a neighboring New England state or halfway across the globe, The Dartmouth Institute’s new residential class of Master of Public Health (MPH) and MS in Healthcare Research students has one thing in common: They know the truth about health care. They know that it could be much better. They know that it could be delivered much more effectively and with far…

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With a focus on improving patient care, the toolkit will be designed to integrate with electronic medical record systems to monitor and measure risk of hospital readmission An estimated 95% of hospitals in the United States use electronic medical records (EMR) to manage and report on patient medical history, including diagnoses and treatment. However, despite the widespread adoption of EMRs,…

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Better management of such high-risk drugs may help reduce the incidence of secondary fragility fractures in vulnerable, elderly population Fragility fractures — those that occur at standing height — are a significant source of sickness and death among the elderly population in the United States. They are also associated with annual direct costs of over $16 billion. As the U.S.…

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Our founding class of online Master of Public Health students just arrived in Hanover for the first of six week-long residential periods required in the two-year-long program. This group of accomplished working professionals has come here from almost every region in the country because they want to be part of The Dartmouth Institute’s tight-knit community of health care…

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