Updates


Health economist Carrie Colla, an associate professor at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, has been chosen to participate in the 2017-2018 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows program. Colla was one of only six mid-career professionals selected to spend a year in Washington, D.C., working on health-related legislative and regulatory issues with…

Read more (0) Comments
Dartmouth-Hitchcock surgery residents who presented at the 5th Annual STARS event included left to right: Kevin Koo, Jesse Columbo, Maureen Hill, Karissa Tauber, Ravinder Kang, John Fallon, Christopher Funderburk. Photos by Lars Blackmore Can training targeted to surgeons reduce the over-prescription of addictive opiates? New research by young surgical investigators at Dartmouth-Hitchcock…

Read more (0) Comments
In a recent op-ed for CNN.com, Dartmouth Institute Director Elliott Fisher and Professor Gil Welch explain why health care costs are bankrupting us—individually and as a nation. Americans, as many of us know, pay much higher prices for drugs and medical services than those in other countries. The cost of open heart surgery is 70% more than the next highest country is one of the…

Read more (0) Comments
At the moment, there is a lot of enthusiasm for using mobile devices to treat mental health disorders because mobile technology is embedded in the way we communicate, not just here in America, but worldwide. Though not considered as a replacement for face-to-face mental health care, mobile devices are thought to have the potential to extend the reach of the limited number of mental health care…

Read more (0) Comments
Many important forces shaping health and health care have more to do with economics and social policy than with any particular medical treatment or procedure. Dartmouth Institute Professor and Economist Ellen Meara takes a closer look. Economic opportunity motivates and enables people to invest in their health; its absence does the reverse. Following a four-fold…

Read more (0) Comments
Patients who choose not to intervene after a diagnosis of thyroid cancer face a challenging path—one that is often defined by a sense of isolation and anxiety, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Veterans Administration in White River Junction, Vermont. As the concept of cancer…

Read more (0) Comments
3 Public and Health Policy Challenges That Will Define the Next Generation Through forecasting future disease and mortality rates, demographers like Dartmouth Institute Assistant Professor Samir Soneji, PhD, are able to predict how changes in population affect public policy. In this installment of the 3-Series, he outlines 3 public and health policy challenges that will…

Read more (1) Comments
In a first-of-its-kind national study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice examined the connection between payer type and low-value care to determine what effect insurance design (commercial insurance vs. Medicare) may have on medical overuse and waste. For most providers and services, the profit margins for delivering care to commercially insured…

Read more (0) Comments
3 Facts About Contraceptive Care: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly Dartmouth Institute Assistant Professor Rachel Thompson heads the Institute’s Right For Me research study, which aims to improve conversations about birth control and support people to make decisions that are right for them. The Good:  Contraceptive access is better than ever. The…

Read more (1) Comments
Substance abuse rates in New Hampshire are significantly higher than national averages. The state has the highest synthetic opioid death rate in the country. Alcohol consumption rates in the state are also much higher than the national average. Of the more than 100,000 people in need of treatment for the disease of addiction in New Hampshire, only between four and six percent get that…

Read more (0) Comments

Page 1 of 11 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

knowledge informs change